Who We Are, How We Serve

The Columbia Union Conference coordinates the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s work in the Mid-Atlantic United States, where 150,000 members worship in 860 congregations. We provide administrative support to eight conferences; two healthcare networks; 81 early childhood, elementary and secondary schools; a liberal arts university; a health sciences college; a 49 community services centers; 8 camps; 5 book and health food stores and a radio station.

Mission Values Priorities

We Believe

God is love, power, and splendor—and God is a mystery. His ways are far beyond us, but He still reaches out to us. God is infinite yet intimate, three yet one,
all-knowing yet all-forgiving.

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Dear Co-workers,

I want to personally thank you for everything you do for the advancement of God's kingdom in your communities and in your churches. I am grateful for this because mission must be at the very top, front, and center of our agenda.

I believe that in order to be effective in reaching others we must have a united vision which leads us all in the same direction. We also need an ongoing and active conversation, which empowers our pastors, congregations, and institutions to reach people within their sphere of influence. This is why, during our 2015 Year-end Meeting, our North American Division Executive Committee voted three very significant outreach initiatives.

Story by Kimberly Luste Maran

All members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church are part of a constituency, which is defined as a group of voters in a specified region who elect representatives to a legislatorial body. In this case, church members of the Columbia Union Conference have designated about 310 delegates who will represent them during the quinquennial constituency session occurring this May (2016).

Every five years representatives elect union leadership, receive reports from union leaders and entities, and vote on general decisions and church business. Reports on finances, church membership, auditing and other statistics are also received and voted. The session delegates will also vote on any proposed changes to the union constitution and bylaws.

Story by Edwin Manuel Garcia

1. Prayerfully study the Great Commission and the inspired counsels on reaching out to “the stranger in our midst.”

2. Get acquainted with refugees and immigrants near your church—in apartment complexes or grocery stores that specialize  in ethnic foods.

3. Contact refugee resettlement agencies that help identify and place refugees in local communities.

4. Identify church members who can teach English as a Second Language classes, provide transportation, assist with tutoring school children or know about the availability of meaningful jobs or employment agencies.

5. Appoint a coordinator who will be sensitive to the refugees’ needs and fears.