Who We Are, How We Serve

The Columbia Union Conference coordinates the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s work in the Mid-Atlantic United States, where 140,000 members worship in 843 congregations. We provide administrative support to eight conferences; two healthcare networks; 100 early childhood, elementary and secondary schools; a liberal arts university; a health sciences college; a dozen community services centers; 5 book and health food stores and a radio station.

Mission Values Priorities

We Believe

God is love, power, and splendor—and God is a mystery. His ways are far beyond us, but He still reaches out to us. God is infinite yet intimate, three yet one,
all-knowing yet all-forgiving.

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COVID-19: A MESSAGE FROM PRESIDENT DAVE WEIGLEY

We are living through an unprecedented time, and while we are not immune to the impact of the coronavirus, we know that we serve an almighty God who sees, who cares and who is an ever-present help in times of trouble. As we journey this crisis together, we are in contact with the leaders of our conferences and institutions, and we are united in our commitment to do all we can to reduce the spread of the virus and help people in our communities. Please join us in praying for an end to COVID-19, and for the health care givers, first responders and other frontline workers who are working tirelessly to save lives.

At this time, our office remains closed to the public, until further notice. Please reach out to members of our administrative and ministry teams, and we will respond as quickly as possible.

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President Dave Weigley

Story by Edwin Manuel Garcia

The worldwide refugee crisis is prompting the United States to open its immigration doors to a larger number of people from regions in turmoil. According to the United States Department of State, nearly 70,000 refugees came to the U.S. last year—the world’s top resettlement location—yet recent political instability in Asia, Central America, the Middle East and Africa will boost admissions to 85,000 this year and 100,000 in 2017.

This dramatic increase will undoubtedly enhance the chances that families fleeing persecution may move into our communities in the near future. How should Seventh-day Adventists respond when refugees from Syria, Burma, Iraq, Honduras, Guatemala and other nations become our neighbors?

Last Wednesday, Thursday and Friday morning WGTS 91.9 listeners stepped up to impact the lives of children around the world with a Compassion drive. By the end of morning show on Friday, listeners had sponsored a station record of more than 860 children, primarily in Haiti and South America.

Jerry Woods, WGTS 91.9 Morning Show host; Kevin Krueger, general manager; Becky Alignay, Midday host; ShareMedia’s Bill Scott; Blanca Vega, Morning show-co-host, and ShareMedia’s Dave Kirby celebrate a successful Compassion drive.“When I think of my kids, I can’t imagine putting them to bed crying because their tummies hurt from hunger. When I think about all our listeners did through Compassion the last couple days I think about the parents who now have the assurance that their child won’t go to bed hungry tonight,” says Kevin Krueger, general manager.

For more than 60 years Compassion has been working to release children from spiritual, economic, social and physical poverty. They work in 26 countries to empower today’s children to be tomorrow’s responsible and fulfilled adults.

We found nine amazing ACS volunteers—including a trio of motorcycle “ministers”—who go the extra mile year-round to help those in need in their mid-Atlantic neighborhoods.

Story by Mark Tyler

Eight women gathered for a prayer group in Battle Creek, Mich., more than 140 years ago with a central idea: the church should provide food and clothing to needy families, minister to the sick and care for the fatherless and widows. Born from that 1874 meeting came the Dorcas Society, an association of female members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church that grew to assist countless people in need throughout North America and beyond.

“Those volunteers did such amazing work that almost anywhere in the world, even today, people remember the selfless women of the Dorcas Society,” explains Minnie McNeil, Adventist Community Services (ACS) coordinator for the Columbia Union Conference and director for the Allegheny East Conference.

Today the work of those service-minded ladies continues through ACS, and has expanded to include men, teens and whole families who volunteer together to extend God’s love to others. The Columbia Union is currently home to 14 official ACS centers run by Adventist members who dedicate their time to spread Jesus’ love in ways the early Dorcas ladies may have only imagined.

Story by Elena Cornwell / Cover Image by iStock Photography

It’s a debate that seems to continue to crescendo since the first accidental discovery of saccharin by Constantine Fahlberg in 1879. Since then most would agree that the fascination and need for sweet foods has become a national problem.

And, although it appears that the addictive and health-related issues induced by sugar has only recently received more national attention, Ellen G. White counseled on that very topic before many even knew it was a problem. In Counsels on Diets and Foods, White admonished, “Sugar clogs the system. It hinders the working of the living machine” (p. 327).

Now her words ring true more than ever, but there is a new player in the sweets aisle—non-nutritive sweeteners—that requires some attention. The American Heart Association describes non-nutritive sweeteners as sweeteners that offer no nutritional benefits, like vitamins and minerals. They also contain low amounts or no calories at all. They are often used to replace sugar because of their low caloric levels.

Three professionals in fields of health across the Columbia Union weigh in on different types of non-nutritive sweeteners and compare them to natural sugar. Understanding how non-nutritive sweeteners affect the body is important to properly manage your diet, they say: