Who We Are, How We Serve

The Columbia Union Conference coordinates the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s work in the Mid-Atlantic United States, where 145,000 members worship in 800 congregations. We provide administrative support to eight conferences, two healthcare networks, 81 elementary and secondary schools, a liberal arts university, a health sciences college, a dozen community services centers, six book and health food stores and a radio station.

Mission Values Priorities

We Believe

God is love, power, and splendor—and God is a mystery. His ways are far beyond us, but He still reaches out to us. God is infinite yet intimate, three yet one,
all-knowing yet all-forgiving.

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Fruit by Wicker Paradise from Flickr

Editorial by Terry Forde

The biblical prophet Jeremiah wrote, “Behold, I will bring [the city] health and cure, and I will heal them” (Jeremiah 33:6) to remind people of God’s promise that still brings us hope today.

As I have the opportunity to talk with members of our Adventist HealthCare team, people will often tell me stories. Some of the stories are funny; some are quite serious. And some of them are so filled with joy that they make everything we do feel important and significant.

These stories are the powerful culture-shaping experiences that we share with one another because they give meaning and shape to our work. They help explain who we are.

Story by V. Michelle Bernard

Susan P. Murray, a member of New Jersey Conference’s Rockaway church, started a journal documenting her feelings about her mother’s decline from Alzheimer’s. She turned those entries into Losing Everything, a book gives a gritty glimpse into how the disease changes its victims and how it impacts those that love them.

Read our interview with Murray below:

Visitor: What do you most want people to understand or know after reading this book?

By Andrew McChesney, Adventist Mission

All the villagers races to the airstrip, singing and dancing, when American pilot Gary Roberts landing at Suminka, a remote village in the Indonesian province of Papua.

It had taken 10 years to cut down the trees by hand to clear the way for an airstrip at their mountainous village, and Gary’s mission plane was the first to land. This was a big event.

As Gary stepped out of the plane, the crowd grew silent. The singing and dancing stopped.

“Is this a Seventh-day Adventist plane?” a man asked.

He saw the three angels’ logo on the airplane’s tail.