News

Editorial by Olive Hemmings

I recall one day sitting on the steep, red oak-stained, concrete front steps of our tiny, rural home in Jamaica on long, carefree days full of wonder and expectation. My twin brother, J. Olive, and I couldn’t have been more than 3 years old because our younger sister was not yet born. On this fine day, mother gathered food for dinner from lush crops surrounding the house and firewood to cook in our homey, outdoor kitchen.

The fowls “cackled” as they lay eggs, the dogs playfully barked, somewhere a cow mooed, and the sound of water gushed over rocks in the nearby stream, invoking a mysterious flow of cool, shadowy air as the sun bore down upon our little faces—unforgettable scenes  of childhood.

Story by Ricardo Bacchus / Feature photo courtesy Mount Vernon News

Heidi Shoemaker, founder of Clean Eating Cooking Class, is on a path to change and motivate men—as well as women and children—to eat healthier.

Shoemaker started her ministry in August 2014 at Ohio Conference’s Mount Vernon church. She wears many hats, one being the conference’s communication director. Now she’s been inspired to put on a chef hat and started cooking healthy recipes in a classroom setting.

Shoemaker explains, “In my own life, I began eating ‘clean,’ that is trying to avoid processed and refined foods and base my diet on real, whole foods.”

Cover Photo by Richard J. Gordon

More than a 1,000 Seventh-day Adventists gathered in Washington, D.C., last weekend to pray, mourn and acknowledge the killing of two black American men and five Dallas police officers. Watch the video Allegheny East Conference's Emmanuel-Brinklow church shared here.

 

Read the entire story here.

Robert Smith, pastor of the Allegheny East Conference’s First Church in Teaneck N.J., has assisted in recovery efforts for the last five major hurricanes over the last 30 years. And, he’s again helping victims, this time in West Virginia, where floodwaters killed at least 25 and left thousands homeless.

On Monday Smith (pictured above with members of the National Guard) and Lee Kimani (pictured below), pastor of the Angaza Sharon church in Newark, Del., arrived in Lefthand, W.Va., an area northwest of Charleston. Smith reports that they’ve knocked on doors, visited 20 churches of all faiths and have counseled 50 families, provided prayer and connected victims to FEMA and Red Cross resources.

Story by WAU Staff

Washington Adventist University (WAU) has entered into a partnership agreement with Radians College that will help qualified graduates further their nursing education through an accelerated evening program offered by the WAU School of Graduate and Professional Studies.

“We are very pleased to partner with Radians College, and happy that we can provide their nursing graduates with a convenient and affordable path to a master’s degree,” says Weymouth Spence, Washington Adventist University president. “Hospital requirements are changing, and this university is in an excellent position to support those students who need to further their education in order to meet the new requirements.”

Story by Costin Jordache

More than 500 healthcare professionals and volunteers will operate a no-cost medical and dental clinic in Beckley, West Virginia on July 13-15, 2016. Approximately $3 million in free health-related services will be offered to noninsured and underinsured residents of Beckley and surrounding areas at the Beckley-Raleigh County Convention Center. The event is organized by Your Best Pathway to Health, a service of Adventist-Laymen’s Services & Industries (ASI), in partnership with the Seventh-day Adventist Church and many other entities.

Story by Heidi Shoemaker / Photos by Hollie Macomber

Walk into Shona Macomber’s classroom at Spring Valley Academy (SVA) in Kettering, Ohio,  and one is transported into an artist’s paradise: bright open space, skylights, soft music and students intently working on projects—from pastels to pottery. Inside students are overheard saying, “This is my favorite class of the week!” while others stop to admire displays outside her classroom.

 Juliana Baioni

Story by Heidi Wetmore

When Jacob Harris was 8 years old, his family moved from Liberia to Maryland so his father could serve as a Lutheran minister. Harris was bullied in school because he was not from the United States. He decided that he didn’t want to be different and started hanging out with gang members. That decision led him to an unhealthy lifestyle including drugs, fighting and crime.